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in terms of egypt, a place to live and, the authoritarian regina was especially effective for some time. this issue of outside support -- outside instability was a mechanism to sustain its role. there were many parts of society that are still susceptible to that kind of appeal, particularly in conditions of growing insecurity. i you addressed this as a matter of public education -- how you address this is a matter of public education. to diffuse the different view of these issues for public schools, and if there is the political will to do that, that is a different question. i thought you're getting to the different issue of human rights education in the security apparatus themselves, giving them a different perspective on their role. we have a double challenge here, and that raises the issue that we talked about, in terms of political will. you may want to elaborate on this point in terms of egypt. >> i would just add and say, the way you characterized the securitization of a lot of aspects of egyptian social like -- i will thank you for mentioning that. it is part institutional. it wa
, tunisia and egypt. the u.s. institute of peace post this to our discussion. >> good morning, everyone. i am steven heydemann, middle east initiative at the u.s. institute of peace and we are delighted to see you all here at today's session on security sector reform in the arab world. i think some of those who rsvp may have been scared away by the false rumor that you would be subjected to a political polling experience following the panel. that's not the case that you don't need to worry about that. were very pleased to have you out here with this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important, but also especially urgent. i don't think that it is an exaggeration to say that what happens with the security sectors in the arab world over the coming year or so, and by security service, i mean the police, the armed forces and most of all of course the very substantial intelligence apparatus is that exist in every arab country, that what happens with those sectors of the bureaucracy in the arab world will let her sleep determined the fate of
for example in egypt the brotherhood may be very reluctant on certain aspects of the security sector they're dealing with the military privileges of the military but other areas, for example, police, basic police reform and abuses and behavior of police i think my question and the brotherhood would be happy to see this corrected and improved, but that there is a perception within the brotherhood by many in the egyptian government institutions that if you were to address these issues it would result in its short term increase in crime and stability and they feel as though they can either fight crime effectively where they could address these kind of concerns which would be useful in the long term but detrimental in the short term and they would pay a heavy political price for the increase in crime on the basic security that would come with this reform. if you talk a little bit about that and also in tunisia i was there a couple of weeks ago, and one of the topics that came up quite a bit was the attacks on the u.s. embassy and while those of us here that might obviously highlight the need
in the past two days. three died yesterday from rocket fire. egypt dispatched its prime minister to gaza to show support for the palestinian people and hamas today. he met with hamas's prime minister about the casualties on the ground. he visited a hospital, showed emotion over the death of a 1-year-old boy. he also read a verse from the koran and later egypt's president mohammed morsi gave a fiery speech in support of the palestinian people on state tv. listen. >> we support the people of gaza. what hurts them, hurts us. >> hate and violence between the israelis and palestinians was sparked by this. israel's assassination of hamas's military chief on wednesday. an assassination that israel called necessary because of increased rocket attacks from gaza into israel the last several weeks. our senior international correspondent ben wiederman has been covering the middle east. you've been covering it for decades now. when you see israel moving hundreds of troops to the border of israel and gaza and saying it's going to call up 16,000 more reservists, what does that sound like they're prepar
crisis in egypt. >> suarez: then, in her final report from turkey, margaret warner looks at the growing clout of syria's kurdish minority, and the impact that's having on the other side of the border. >> brown: when does a co-worker count as a supervisor? that question was before the supreme court today in a case about harassment. marcia coyle explains. >> suarez: and we examine new figures from the pew research center showing that young voters played a decisive role reelecting president obama. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: a still tentative american economy looked o
in egypt and tunisia to push this forward and to overcome the increasing polarization. >> i will add to and dan's remarks and say in terms of technicalities and specific steps that need to be taken to reconfigure the domestic security establishment, they are all laid out there in a study that was put together by a group of civil society leaders as well as a group of meetings from the securities sector, commonly known as police for egypt. there's a great deal of debate within civil society about the exact concrete actionable step that needs to be taken in the short run and in the long run some of these steps when themselves to the type of changes that would require the liberation. this is one issue to keep in mind. the dialog's ideas are out there but what is missing as dan mentioned is the political will, the seriousness to engage in dialogue on this issue, even if they're not ready to adopt policy recommendations, there needs to be some kind of ongoing dialogue on these issues but at the same time i want to point out the issue of political will is important, there will always be a c
. >>> next, a discussion on the state of security forces in egypt, tunisia in libya. also the arab spurring countries are in a political transition with the army, police and intelligence services playing different roles in each country. hosted by the u.s. institute of peace, this is two hours. good morning everyone. i am steve heydemann for the middle east initiatives of the u.s. institute of peace, and we are delighted to see you all here today at the session on security sector reform in the arab world. i think some of those that rsvped may have been scared off by the false rumors that he would be colin following the panel. that is not the case. so you don't need to worry about that. we are very pleased to have you all here with us this morning. i would like to stress that our topic this morning i think is both particularly important, but also especially urgent. i don't think that it is an exaggeration to say that what happens with the securities sector within the arab world or over the coming year or so come and buy securities sectors i mean the police, the armed forces, and most of all t
there are major developments to tell you about in egypt. new protests breaking out after egyptian president mohammed morsi announced far-reaching powers placing himself above any government law. that has sparked the violent clashes that he see here on the streets and dozens of protests but the country's justice minister now saying there is some sort of resolution on all of this imminent. steve harrigan joins us now streaming live from cairo with the latest. steve, do you think that we could see some kind of compromise today on this? >> reporter: martha, we are certainly hearing sound from the presidential teamsh to reace opposition in a push for a possible compromise. what we're likely to see in the next 90 minutes here is a meeting between egypt's president and some top judges here inside cairo. judges across the country have gone on strike. they say the president tried to put himself above the law. we could see some scaling back from a presidential team that has been surprised by the angry reaction to the move by president morsi, martha. martha: such a key moment for the future of egypt.
years. you've had dramatic circumstances in egypt and libya and tunisia. they're working on syria. you could point to examples in borrow ran, for example, that's not moving as fast. part of the obama philosophy is very -- which is very interesting is trying to find what is possible in this area that does not get america caught in the trap of unnecessary war, repetition of quagmire. you have two examples of egypt and libya which are most striking. people on the streets clear my opposition to the dictator there. there are plenty of examples, for example, bush in tan man square. -- ton man square. -- tiananmen square. there's lots of examples where we tell folks -- bush sr. and iraq telling saddam if you want to crack down the shia, so be it . and because of that factor, that's one of the key factors that got them pushed out. libya was a different story where you have the possibility of a massacre occurring and obama said i would like to stop that from happening, very much so. but if i can't get a true blue international coalition through the u.n., then i might not do it. >> how about a t
and israel exchanged rocket and shell fire. in november 13, is real and hamas said messages via egypt indicating interest in a truce, but then it degraded from there. at the question is whether egypt can play a role, or the united states which has sent hillary clinton, can play a role. the israelis debate a ground invasion of your reporting from gaza city, the olive orchards, they lied to enter the border. monday the area was a virtual no mans land. hundreds of families have fled. it says that gazana are not the only ones encouraged about a ground invasion. talks in cairo, continue in cairo. let us hear from on next call, terry in maryland, on our line for republicans. caller: america has no real influence in the middle east. i say that because we have been trying to negotiate this cents ronald reagan. and if we had any influence with the arab-speaking population, we basically would have succeeded by now. the reality is, for half of the countries, we are nothing more than ana tm, and the other half, -- we are nothing more nothingan atm and for the others we are nothing more than an an
funds. he says he is willing to begin peace negotiations. >> egypt's parliament, dominated by conservative muslims approved a new constitution early this morning. the assembly's more moderate members are crying foul. it is sparking another day of protests against president mohamed morsi. morsi's supporters plan to stage a massive demonstration tomorrow. holly williams is in cairo and has been watching this whole crisis unfold. >> reporter: a week after president mohamed morsi gave himself broad new powers that some egyptians say make him a dictator in all but name his islamist allies have rushed to finish a final draft of the country's constitution. it could now be put to a referendum before the end of the year. protests and violent clashes in cities across egypt, president morsi defended his power grab last night on egyptian state tv. he said his new authority is needed to guide egypt through its democratic transition and that he will give up his expanded powers once the country has a new constitution. a final draft of the constitution is now complete, written and voted on
for the opportunity to brief you today on my three-day visit to egypt, israel, the occupied palestinian territory, and jordan. since the situation in does that and israel escalated last week, i made it my priority to contribute to halt the violence with a priority aim of protecting civilians. i canceled a previously planned trip to travel to the middle east as a signal for the need for international diplomatic mobilization and prevent the further escalation that would put the region at risk. to strengthen the commendable efforts by egypt to reach a cease-fire. i want to welcome the cease-fire announcement. i commend the parties for stepping back from the brink and commend the president of egypt for his exceptional leadership. i will -- our focus now must be on ensuring that the ceasefire holds and all those needs in gaza, and there are many, that they receive the aid that they need. as i assure their relief for the people in gaza and israel and in the international community, that the violence is stopping. but we are all aware of the risk, and we are all aware that many details must be solidified
as the cia director. >>> in egypt today one man is dead after violent clashes with police. protesters are camping out in cairo's tahrir square. in a scene strikingly similar to what we saw in the revolution almost two years ago, the demonstrators are voicing their anger with president mohamed morsi after what some are calling an unprecedented power grab. cnn's reza sayah is joining us from cairo once again. reza, we're hearing about attacks against several muslim brotherhood offices in egypt. what do you know about that? >> reporter: according to the brotherhood spokesperson, two of their offices were attacked by anti-morsi protesters. the brotherhood says the protesters were carrying molotov cocktails, clubs and knives and destroyed and heavily damaged these offices. remember, muslim brotherhood had called for a one-million-man demonstration of their own today to rival the opposition's demonstrations. late last night they called it off to avoid violence. but in these two particular cities north of cairo, they didn't avoid violence. >> reza, we're also seeing and i want to show our vi
but egypt and possibly beyond. jenna: let's focus on syria. this conflict has been going on for 19 months. woe just heard news that the opposition group there elected a leader, a christian, the second-in-command being a member of the muslim brotherhood. we keep hearing that the opposition forces are very amorphous, we can't side with them because they don't know who they are. how do we interrupt the forces if they are keith a network and are at work in this region? >> jenna, very interesting we moved from we don't know who they are to we very well know who they are at this time. the central force and opposition is the muslim brotherhood. there is consensus among the region and observe. >> the number two of the new group, is a number two of the muslim brotherhood in syria. the chief, the new president of the council is indeed a christian. he is secular. he has been very liberal. he will oppose the muslim brotherhood. the problem, jenna, he doesn't have influence. those who control the ground are islamist militias. those who control most of the institutions are muslim brotherhood. you have
netanyahu of israel and president mohammed morsi of egypt. the main word they're using is de-escalate telling the two nations to scale back the violence but so far neither side is willing to cease-fire unless the other will bend to their demands. egypt does have a peace tree with israel which is why that country could be the key in putting a stop to the violence. more john fuglesang coming up after the break. stay with us. you're about to watch an viewer created ad message for little caesars who proudly salutes united states veterans everywhere. >> clarksville is a small town on the tennesse/kentucky boader and it is a really great place to raise a family. my name is lloyd allard i was a chief officer in the special forces, i was in the army for 23 years. i have made 1400 parachute jumps. well, my experience in the military was varied. i spent a lot of time in iraq, a lot of time in kuwait. i did two tours in iraq and i decided it was time to do something different with my life. i saw little caesars as a way to give something back to my family. the lit
was afraid to look at god. then the lord said, i have observed the misery of my people who are in egypt. i have heard their cries on account of their taskmasters. i know their sufferings. i have come to deliver them from the egyptians. and to bring them up out of that land, to a good and broad land. on land flowing with milk and honey. to the country of the canaanites, the hittites, the amorites, and the jebusites. the cry of the israelites has now come to me. i have also seen how the egyptians oppress them. so come, i will send you to pharaoh to bring my people, the israelites, out of egypt. but moses said to god, who am i that i should go to pharaoh and bring the israelites out of egypt? god said, i will be with you. and this will be the sign for you that it is i who sent you. when you have brought the people out of egypt, you shall worship god on this mountain. but moses said to god, if i come to the israelites and say to them, the god of your ancestors has sent me to you, they will ask me, what is his name? what shall i say to them? god said to moses, i am who i am. he said further, th
and sending a message to palestinians. egypt is standing by the people of gaza and their pain, he said. people took vac of the relative lull in violence to stock up on whatever they could. since israel began its attacks getting food has become more difficult this man explained. hamas has not fired into southern israel and israel fired into gaza with the death toll so far is 19, including 5 children. the latest violence exploded with israel assassinated hamas' military chief on wednesday n.gaza, gunfire, anger and defiance and a creaseless barrage of rockets and missiles, the israeli air force carrying out what it called precision strikes, but in crowded gaza it's the civilians who bear the brunt. this child, the son of a local bbc technician, was 11 months old when he was killed by an israeli air strike. savannah, you know, we've been speaking to palestinians here, and the sense they have is fear and anxiety. they are extremely afraid of what could be coming next on the horizon. the focus though is what is it going to take to break this impact now between the palestinian factions and the israe
billion going to egypt and the muslim brotherhood. i do not think that money ought to be sent because they proved they will be working with us against terrorism, by their trading with our good friend in the middle east, israel, and we need to be unified with israel, shoulder to shoulder with israel, preventing iran from getting nuclear weapon capability. one of the big missed opportunities of this president being quiet when they had the spring uprising and the resolution -- the revolution in iran. i remember ronald reagan said -- he called the soviet union the evil empire. we should have at least said those in iran who wanted a free and just society. the president kept quiet. i do agree with tim kaine on the issue of virginia tech. everyone should be commended by that response and all campuses are more say. i would like to ask you do you think we ought to be sending -- spending $450 billion? >> in my response, george talked more about sequestered. i want to do the same. we put two very clear visions on the table. we agree we have to stop defense cuts. we have two plans. i say we can a
interest. you take a look at egypt. under the original peace plan, we give tremendous amount of foreign aid to egypt. right now egypt is threatening israel. egypt is threatening the region because of the arabs spring. we have to rethink the dollars we're spending the egypt. we have to say these dollars are for maintaining a security and a piece. if you are not participating, you do not get them. we have to continue our commitment in foreign policy to israel. israel is our strongest ally. it is our sister country. we need to do everything we can to fulfil our commitment. the military aides we still is a real is that right here in america. when you look at the arab spring, there was a lot of hope that this would be continuing democracy, and we're falling into what has become not secular governments, but religious governments, and we need to be gathering up all of our allies and be making a firm statement that this region needs to be statement -- stabilized. we need to protect the people who serve and our state departments, not in all facets, whether ngo's the state department. it cannot procu
proactive and extending aid to egypt before and after morsi was elected, and i think it's important to understand what sort of things egypt needed right away was an ability to sell government bonds and treasury bills were because it takes about 14% interest which is pretty high for a government come and immediate deaths things look terrible. they came in and said okay. we will buy your one month issue of bills. a good payment unless the government defaults on everything. but that has helped relieve some of the interest pressure and try to move egypt out of the debt trap than greece or italy or spain. the second thing they have done is like the development bank there's quite good development banks that help identify the investment projects, make sure they are built without corruption and that they become effective. i think it is $4.5 billion that were qatar and saudi arabia have and christine was out there in september and they were working on a long program, very low interest rate and there would be another four and a half million or so but then egypt has a fighting chance to get an
times) reports that some senators are threatening to end aid to egypt. mohammad morsy has broadened his powers less repair john mccain says that while the u.s. is thankful for his help facilitating the cease-fire between israel and the gaza strip, he criticized his decision, which has prompted days of violent street protests in egypt. another senator, max baucus, the chairman of the senate finance committee, says that he wants to preserve the estate tax break, which is important for farmers who want to pass down land to their children. he hopes to expand the production tax credit for wind energy. watch the senate live on c- span2. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. >> you listen to their member, who said the damage was unprecedented, that it may be the worst storm the city has ever faced, and that the tidal surge was 14. governor christie said the damage was unthinkable. we had fires, hurricane-force wind, massive flooding, deep snow. you look at that and the flooding into the subway systems, the shut-down of the stock exchanges, you get a sense of the massive scale
embassy over run, our ambassador killed. in egypt, the american flag brought down. in egypt, the persecution of coptic christians throughout egypt. in saudi arabia, we -- women are still treated as second-class citizens. in iran, roadside bombs against american troops. in venezuela, calling for that is correct -- destruction for our way of life. we can do that or we can depend on counties, ohio, the list goes on and on. let me leave you with this commitment. there is going to be a day when i go to washington and someone who is a powerful person puts his hand on my shoulder and says you had better vote for this legislation or i'm going to kick you off your committee or somebody said you had better vote for this or i will shut off or fund-raising or a journalist said its u.s. better vote for this or i will write a bad editorial about you. my commitment to all of you is i will look at journalist, that lobbyists, that political boss in the eye and tell them i do not work for them. my boss is the people the state of ohio and no one in washington is going to push me around. thank
about our embassy in cairo egypt. local tv host had played this clip incessantly and raging muslims -- enraging muslims throughout egypt who stormed our embassy and tore down the american flag and put up an islamist flag. a few hours later the -- they said it was over the video even though the next day the president referred to it as an act of terror. four americans were killed including our ambassador. ever since then, our republican friends have been using this terror attack, i'm sorry did i say using? i meant exploiting this terror attack to smear the president in any way they can. as you know, in 9-11-01 a terror attack is a reason to unite and cheer a president and in 9-11-12, it is an excuse to smear a president. there have been rumors of course that the president might be nominating susan rice, our u.n. ambassador to be his next secretary of state. and the most unlikely love couple of all in d.c., john mccain and lindsey graham got together to -- well, to say a lot of ignorant stuff. let's begin with j
on the ground in places like libya and egypt. you think this will reflect well on the u.s., or look like we are entering conflict for our own and game? guest: i don't think we choose to enter conflicts. we stuck with mubarak for while. we went with the protests as soon as they began on the streets. president obama trying not to become embroiled in to torsions abroad where he does not have to, but when things get too -- in situations abroad where he does not have to, but when things get to bad, he will. host: a comment on twitter. talking about ben ghazi and libya. what do those debts to reveal about president obama's foreign policy leadership? guest: that is a tough situation. i have been more following the campaign than the twists and turns of what happened in libya. it has not gotten a lot of coverage in some of the media. fox news have been pounding on it hard. i think maybe we will get some cooler answers after the election. host: jacksonville, fla., independent caller, patricia. caller: i am so sorry. i have three points i want to make and i were you to be patient with me. the first is
between egypt and yemen. i think we know that saudi arabia had mixed feelings about how quickly mubarak was dumped, and -- but they also, the saudis playeded a crucial role of easing yemen. it was not easy. it was slow. it was bloody, but compared to the other changes, it was not that bad. in april of to 20* -- 2011, just as the arab spring was in full bloom, if you will, the c7 finance ministers met in france and formed a partnership with the vision that was simple that europe had been through this kind of thing before. after eastern europe broke away
of letting the democracy happen what happened in egypt, libya, democratic elections. they're going to have to deal with their own almost civil war like we had to make sure that they get the government they want and not necessarily our outcome can't just be we can establish a government that's friendly to us. it has to be the people and sometimes it takes generations for these governments to really take hold and be by the people. host: thanks for the call. guest: that's a fair point. i wouldn't say that the problem in afghanistan is the united states is opposed to democracy per say. what i would say is that the united states and the rest of the international community and after gans themselves have a long way to go before they have something that looks like a credible and effective democracy takes root. and before we get there there is the prospect that the country could revert back to if not civil war but extensive conflict throughout the country, extreme violence and that is of concern to the united states. and the reason it's of concern is not simply a humanitarian one or to put who we w
their laptops, and they simply type into the search engine the word egypt, and they got a totally different responses. why? because there is a process going on. every time we search for something on our laptop, we are not only gathering information. we are giving information about what we buy, about what we like, about what our political bias sees maybe -- biases may be, and you and i ought to get the same information if we tie in the same word. that is kind of scary. >> somebody is making up their mind about what we want. >> it is not somebody. it is a series of 0s and 1s. it is a computer algorithm. >> the algorithm is fine, and i understand it exists, and i will salute it. is there, but i want to know what that has to do with journalism. who gets up in the morning and covers some say -- something? who is going to cover a war? who is going to cover a campaign? without the journalists doing on is information gathering, all this stuff is below it. >> there are plenty of people who are going to do gathering, but the key word -- >> that is not true. there are fewer reporters covering the war
on c-span3, the u.s. institute of peace on the state of security forces in egypt, tunisia, and libya. this presidential campaign is being counted by the hours. we will show you both of the campaign rallies tonight here on c-span. tomorrow at this time the polls will be closing in the east and it will be determined whether the president has another four-year lease on the white house or whether mitt romney begin it is transition. the numbers tell the story from the polls this election is a dead heat. turn out will determine who wins and the fight for the battleground states continues. later tonight we'll have live coverage of the candidates in iowa and new hampshire. we did learn from the romney campaign two stops have been scheduled for tomorrow one in ohio. the president will p spend the night in chicago in his own home. he has no appearance ps for tomorrow before he travels for a victory or concession speech. we will have that as all of our coverage tomorrow. first from the campaigns some new web videos released earlier in the day. >> the romney campaign has put up an ad
. tommy more about what you mean. caller: in recent conflicts such as those in egypt and libya we saw the president rather than simply propping up leaders the u.s. formally agreed with cover to go along with the protest movement on the ground. the you think this help the u.s. image or the best to look on this as for their entry complex for our own game? the way i saw things is we stuck with mubarak for awhile. i think this is president obama trying not to become embroiled in situations abroad where he debts that have to, but when things get to a point where you have to insert -- assert himself, he will. host: right wing on twitter as if obama has apologized for leaving our ambassador and guards to die? what has the incident there, the death of those american citizens revealed about president obama's foreign-policy leadership? guest: that is a really tough situation. i have been worth all we the campaign than the twists and turns of what has been happening. that has not gotten a lot of coverage in some of the media. fox news has been pounding on that hard. i think what we're seeing --
, and they simply typed into the search engine the word egypt. and they got totally different responses. why? because there is that process going on, every time that we search for something on our laptop, we are not only gather information, we are getting information. we're getting information about what we buy, about what we find interesting, about what we like, about perhaps what our political biases may be, so that in theory a search engine that ought to be giving me objective information, and you and i ought to get the same information if we type in the same word, not so anymore. that's kind of scary. >> because somebody is making up his or her mind as to what it is that we want. >> it's not somebody. it is, it is a series of zeros and ones. it's a series of, it is the computer, what is the word i'm looking for? [laughter] algorithm, thank you. [laughter] it is the algorithm which is -- >> algorithm is defined, understand it exists, and i respected and i will salute it. it so there. but i want to know what all of that has to do with journalism? who gets up in the morning and covers somet
the numbers of the top three diversity visas were as follows. 2009, ethiopia, 3,829. nigeria, 3,720. and egypt, a country i visited many, many times, 3,336. no question at all. they are all on the continent of africa. but as recently as 1994, earlier on in this long-standing 30-year setaside, it went more like this, poland, 17,000,396. ireland, 15,659. the united kingdom, great britain, 3,174. mr. speaker, one of the problems with the diversity visa is in fact it's a question of whether you put in all the names in the phone book or not. it's a question of who is gaming the system. it doesn't have any sort of, if you will, setaside to ensure an outcome. and within the outcome, whether you are taking from poland, ireland, united kingdom, or in 1999, the next year, few years later, it switched to bulgaria, nigeria, and albania. these top names that occur have a lot to do with how many people throw their name in a hat. and nothing to do with whether or not they really want to be americans. whether they really have the qualifications, whether they have any connection to america that would allow the
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)